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Independent Services Available In Worcestershire

 

  

 

Healthwatch Worcestershire (HWW)

 

Healthwatch is a national consumer champion for health and social care services and gives a local Healthwatch its statutory functions.  HWW is the local branch.   As a statutory watchdog, the role of Healthwatch is to ensure that health and social care services, and the government, put people at the heart of their care.  The aim of a local Healthwatch is to give residents and communities a stronger voice to influence and challenge how health and social care services are provided within their locality.  Local Healthwatch provides or signposts people to information to help them make choices about health and care services. 

 

The HWW website can be found at:

www.healthwatchworcestershire.co.uk

The Health Checkers Team want to hear from people with a learning disability in Worcestershire - for more information click on the link below:-

Access to health care services for people with disability

 

 

 

Antibiotics – To be taken seriously!

By Dr Helen Rosewarne

 

 

Antibiotics are lifesaving drugs which have revolutionised the medical care in the last 80 years. They are important medicines which fight only bacteria. However resistance to bacteria is a growing problem in Europe. As a result of inappropriate use and prescribing antibiotics, the bacteria are learning to adapt and find ways to survive the effects of an antibiotic. The more an antibiotic is used, the more bacteria become resistant to it. In addition, few new antibiotics are being developed. As resistance in bacteria grows and with no new drugs available, it will be more difficult to treat infections and this affects patient care. Many people believe that antibiotics can cure common health problems, such as coughs and colds, sore throats and earaches. These are most often viral infections which cannot be treated by antibiotics. Not only will the antibiotic be of no benefit, they will become less effective against the bacteria they are intended to treat.

 

What can I do?

 

It is important that we use antibiotics in the right way, to slow down resistance and make sure these lifesaving medicines remain effective for us and future generations. Antibiotics should only be taken when prescribed by a health professional. They should be the correct medicine for your illness at the right dose – do not be tempted to use “left over” antibiotics from previous prescriptions. Antibiotics should be taken as directed because not finishing the whole course can also lead to antibiotic resistance. Many antibiotics are prescribed for mild infections when they do not need to be. Colds and most coughs, sinusitis, earache and sore throats often get better without antibiotics. No one likes feeling unwell but in a lot of cases antibiotics will not speed up your recovery. Your body’s natural defences will fight the infections and help us save antibiotics for cases where they may be essential and even lifesaving now and for the future.

 

If you do feel ill and are concerned you are not fighting an infection, please call the surgery for advice. With the autumn and winter months just around the corner please have a think about how you can help in the important fight against antibiotic resistance.

 

With thanks for your support from the staff at Great Witley Surgery.      

 

 

Online Appointment Booking

We now offer online appointment booking - please click on the Appointments heading for further information

 

Text Message Reminders

With immediate effect patients between the ages of 14-18 will not receive text message reminders unless they contact the surgery to provide details of their own specific mobile number.

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